How do home automation systems work? How do home automation systems work?
There is a huge trend in almost every sector of consumer goods to make things “smart”, which entails wireless or Bluetooth capabilities linked with... How do home automation systems work?

There is a huge trend in almost every sector of consumer goods to make things “smart”, which entails wireless or Bluetooth capabilities linked with or controlled by an app. On their own, these might appear to be a gimmick or a mild convenience at best, but most can be linked into home automation systems.

Home automation is the growing trend of making a good portion of your home “smart” and therefore controllable from a single device. This can be a simple way to turn on your heating as you are leaving work, or far more complex interactions.

Home automation is still an emerging trend, so most people will have little experience with smart appliances. To help you get started, we’ve put together a brief rundown of some of the basics, along with the essentials of creating complex automation.

Home Automation Basics

The most obvious requirement of getting started with home automation systems is smart or network-aware devices. These come in all shapes and sizes, from smart thermostats to ovens, washing machines, and security systems.

How much you will be able to accomplish with one device is largely down to the device. Some will be fairly simple, allowing you to set up recurring automated tasks or triggering them to do something from your phone. Others, like smart ovens, will communicate a great deal of information to the app, giving you suggestions on temperature and timing based on what you are cooking.

Creating Actual Automation

A single smart appliance on its own doesn’t make a home automation system. For that, you want to build relationships between devices, either by working with home automation companies like http://digitalinteriors.co.uk/, or through do-it-yourself scripting like IFTTT.

Regardless of the approach taken, you will be setting up functions that are triggered by other actions. This could mean your smart security system automatically activates when you lock your door, your lights turn on when the system detects your car pulling in, or far more complex interactions involving multiple independent systems, such as setting up a “visitors for dinner” function that triggers your heating and oven to turn on, and your Roomba to do a quick cleaning.

Home automation systems are very much emerging, but the technology is expanding in terms of number of devices and their functions at an incredible rate.

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