The legend of William Wallace The legend of William Wallace
Scottish rebel, common man of the people and the leader of a great rebellion William Wallace is remembered in many ways. The trouble is,... The legend of William Wallace

Scottish rebel, common man of the people and the leader of a great rebellion William Wallace is remembered in many ways. The trouble is, the story put out by poems and the film Brave heart are not strictly accurate but why let the truth get in the way of a good story? Wallace’s tale is still worth telling and regardless of the lack of facts everyone likes it when a smaller force stands up and beats an Empire. Empire building was exactly what Edward I of England was doing, and it’s reported that a young Wallace helped him achieve this by serving as an archer in his conquest of Wales. It’s thought to be the reason why Wallace is so good at battles. Notwithstanding, there are many bronze statues to Wallace, such as the one outside Edinburgh castle, as befits a hero of Scottish independence.  If you’d like a nice piece of bronze in your home then www.gillparker.com/ can provide that. YOu can find incredible pieces from bronze statues through to a Horse Sculpture or a sculpture of your favourite animal.

Wallace was a minor noble, not the working class crofter forced to take up arms in defence of his freedom.  It’s also unlikely that he was seven feet tall and built like a giant given the type of low calorific food and diet at the time especially if he was low born. He was born into an economically stable and peaceful Scotland ruled by Alexander III but this all change when the King fell of his horse and died. With the Kings children dead it fell to his granddaughter Margaret, the Maid of Norway. She was still a child and stuck in Norway so guardians were appointed to look after her. Crossing the North Sea is never easy and this was doubly so in the thirteen century and she too was dead by the time she reached Orkney. A power vacuum ensued with all the Scottish clans laying claim to the throne.

In an ill-advised move the Scottish nobles asked Edward I to meditate. He said that this was fine as long as they recognised him as de facto leader until it was all sorted out. It never gets sorted out as Edward makes the favoured King John Balliol renounce his throne and promptly invades Berwick on Tweed going onto to defeat the Scots.

All that changed at Stirling Bridge. Crossing over the bridge the English were attacked by the Scots who were amassed in tight groups. The English couldn’t use their heavy Calvary as the infantry was in the way. The bridge collapsed and most of the English army was drowned. It was a great victory for the heavily outnumbered Scots. It was a characteristic of Wallace to use hit and run guerrilla tactics which annoyed Edward as it was totally against the chivalric code of turning up and getting massacred by the bigger army.

admin